honey is our passion

Thank you for visiting our website.  We are passionate about honey and love talking to people and sharing our experiences as Beekeepers (Apiarists).  Not only is honey a delicious tasting food that has many medicinal qualities, the process of how it is produced by the bees, is incredibly fascinating.  You might like to read below a bit about how our busy bees make delicious honey that we bring to you to enjoy.

some facts about our honey

  • All of Our Honey is Double Cold Filtered overnight through NYTREL (TM) (Material Filters)
  • The only ingredients contained in every jar of our honey produced is: Pure, Organic Honey
  • Blue Ironbark Honey is from our apiary at Lake Kurwongbah outside Old Petrie Town
  • NO Heating, NO Blending, NO adding foreign substances or flavourings is undertaken to our Honey
  • We always have capped, by the bees, delicious Honeycomb available (we supply it to you in a jar of Honey)
  • We make a Creamed Honey with a 150 year old special recipe
  • We are  Beekeepers- Apiarists (DPI Reg: M898)

Registered with the Queensland Government Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry/Bees No: M898

http://www.daff.qld.gov.au/bees


Philosophy

Errol has been associated with honey bees since he was a young boy growing up in an orphange, "Margaret Marr Memorial Home for Boys", at Wynnum North in the 1940's and early 1950's. A beekeeper had an Apiary just past the orphanage on Tingal Road, Wynnum North, and he supplied the boys beeswax for their archery bow strings. From time to time some boys, including Errol, would help him out with his Honey Bees.  In his later years, Errol has been a devoted Apiarist with sometimes up to 200 hives on properties around South-East Queensland's Ironbark forests.

For the last 20 years, Errol and Julie have had 40 plus Triple Box Beehives in the lush Blue Ironbark forests that surround Lake Kurwongbah, outside Petrie Village and further on from Old Petrie Town, and along Scout Road, where the Scouts have their Jamborees.

The Honey is classed as Organic, Pure, Unprocessed, (no heat), cold filtered honey, managed with honeybee original qualities maintained. Integrity in production retains the Amino Acids and Enzymes, (building blocks for our health), which the Honey Bees manifested into the Nectar, when collecting it from the Flowers.

Blue Ironbark Organic Honey from Queensland, Australia, was voted "Best Honey in the World" at the Irish World Championship of Honey.

We have an Export Quality classification.

We only supply PURE ORGANIC Honey Products. NO Heating, NO Blending, NO adding foreign substances or flavourings to Honey. Honeycomb Wax is harmless, and can be swallowed. (Honeycomb assists in allergy therapy).

Pure, Organic Blue Ironbark Honey is naturally: AntiBacterial, AntiBiotic, AntiOxidant, AntiInflammatory.

It is made from all natural Organic Nectar, (no farms, no fertilizers, no diesel trucks or tractors),  so you can be sure it is not only tasty and fresh but absolutely delicious.



so how do bees make honey?

This is a question we are asked often and it is so fascinating that we love telling people about it.

To explain this in a simple way: Honey bees collect pollen and NECTAR in the spring and summer when most flowers and plants are in bloom.
They use their long, tubelike tongues like straws (called proboscis) to suck the NECTAR  out of the flowers and they store it in their special honey stomachs to carry it to the beehive.

While inside the bee's honey stomach for about ten minutes, the NECTAR mixes with the amino acids, proteins and enzymes produced by the digestive system in the honey stomach of the bee, converting the nectar into honey.
The bees then drop the honey into the beeswax comb, which are hexagonal cells made of wax produced by the bees, and repeat the process until the combs are full.

To prepare for long-term storage, the bees fan their wings to evaporate and thicken the honey (note: nectar is 80% water and honey is about 14-18% water). When this is done, the bees cap the honeycomb with beeswax produced from their abdomen and move on to the next empty comb, starting all over again.

So, in a nutshell, the honey we eat is the flowers' NECTAR that honey bees have collected, and dehydrated to enhance its nutritional properties.

Want to know more about Honey? Go to Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honey

HOW GOOD IS HONEY

Here are three honey nutrition facts that will make you feel good about eating honey:

One:

One tablespoon of table sugar or sucrose contains 46 calories, while one tablespoon of natural sweetener honey has 64 calories. Though honey may have more calories, we actually need to use less of it since it is sweeter than table sugar. As a result, you may in fact consume even less amount of calories that you would with sugar. And in the long run even though honey is more expensive, it may be more economical than table sugar. I was taken aback when I first found out how much table sugar I was consuming when I take a can of coke -- 10 teaspoons, and a 50g chocolate bar -- 7 teaspoons!

Two:

Table sugar is sucrose, which is made up of two molecules bonded together. When we eat table sugar, our stomach has to use its own enzymes to separate the molecules apart before we can use the sugar's energy. Honey is quite different. The bees have added a special enzyme to the nectar that divides the sucrose into glucose and fructose -- two simple sugars for our bodies can absorb directly.

Hence, honey vs sugar, honey has a healthier Glycemic Index (GI) which measures the negative impact of a given food on the blood-glucose level. The lower the GI rating, the slower the absorption and infusion of sugars into the bloodstream and hence a more gradual and healthier digestion process.

Three:

Unlike honey, table sugar lacks minerals and vitamins (hence it's been often called empty calories), they draw upon the body's nutrients to be metabolized into the system. When these nutrients are all used up, metabolizing of undesirable cholesterol and fatty acid is impeded, contributing to higher cholesterol and promoting obesity due to higher fatty acid on the organs and tissues. That is why it is not uncommon for fat people to suffer from malnutrition and many other health related problems. So the message is, honey vs sugar, if you are watching your weight, honey will be a smarter choice than sugar. Besides the differences in nutrition, I feel sugar can never compete with honey in taste. Though both are sweet, honey has such a unique flavour that can be very useful and superior in many foods and beverages.

SOURCE: Honey vs Sugar http://www.benefits-of-honey.com/honey-vs-sugar.html  (Australian Women's Weekly)


 WE can be contacted Day/Night seven days a week. Email: erroljuliemarsh@iinet.net.au

or Phone: 0432 688 645 Errol or Julie.

BEESWAX

WE HAVE RAW BEESWAX (Refined Once) available.

When we extract the honey, we cut off the wax caps from each honeycomb cell with an uncapping knife. Its color varies from nearly white to brownish, but most often a shade of yellow, depending on purity and the type of nectar gathered by the bees. Wax from the brood comb of the honey bee hive tends to be darker than wax from the honeycomb. Impurities accumulate more quickly in the brood comb. Due to the impurities, the wax must be rendered before further use.

The wax may further be clarified by heating in water. Beeswax may be softened by dilution with vegetable oil to make it more workable at room temperature.


Beeswax has many and varied uses. Primarily, it is used by the bees in making their honeycomb foundation. Apart from this use by bees, the use of beeswax has become widespread and varied. Purified and bleached beeswax is used in the production of food, cosmetics, and pharmaceuticals. The three main types of beeswax products are yellow, white, and beeswax absolute. Yellow beeswax is the crude product obtained from the honeycomb, white beeswax is bleached yellow beeswax, and beeswax absolute is yellow beeswax treated with alcohol.   

In food preparation, it is used as a coating for cheese; by sealing out the air, protection is given against spoilage (mold growth). Beeswax may also be used as a food additive E901, in small quantities acting as a (glazing agent), which serves to prevent water loss, or used to provide surface protection for some fruits. Soft gelatin capsules and tablet coatings may also use E901. Beeswax is also a common ingredient of natural chewing gum.

Use of beeswax in skin care and cosmetics has been increasing. A German study found beeswax to be superior to similar barrier creams (usually mineral oil-based creams such as petroleum jelly), when used according to its protocol.[9] Beeswax is used in lip balm, lip gloss, hand creams, and moisturizers; and in cosmetics such as eye shadow, blush, and eye liner. Beeswax is an important ingredient in moustache wax and hair pomades, which make hair look sleek and shiny.

Candle-making has long involved the use of beeswax, which is highly flammable, and this material traditionally was prescribed (in large part), for the making of the Paschal candle or "Easter candle". It is further recommended for the making of other candles used in the liturgy of the Roman Catholic Church.[10] Beeswax is also the candle constituent of choice in the Orthodox Church.[11]

From a relatively small production of about 10,000 tons a year, a number of different niches are served:[12] beeswax is an ingredient in surgical bone wax, which is used during surgery to control bleeding from bone surfaces; shoe polish and furniture polish can both use beeswax as a component, dissolved in turpentine or sometimes blended with linseed oil or tung oil; modeling waxes can also use beeswax as a component; pure beeswax can also be used as an organic surfboard wax.[13] Beeswax blended with pine rosin, can serve as an adhesive to attach reed plates to the structure inside a squeezebox. It can also be used to make Cutler's resin, an adhesive used to glue handles onto cutlery knives. It is used in Eastern Europe in egg decoration; it is used for writing, via resist dyeing, on batik eggs (as in pysanky) and for making beaded eggs. Beeswax is used by percussionists to make a surface on tambourines for thumb rolls. It can also be used as a metal injection moulding binder component along with other polymeric binder materials.[14] Beeswax was formerly used in the manufacture of phonograph cylinders.

Beeswax has many and varied uses. Primarily, it is used by the bees in making their honeycomb foundations. Apart from this use by bees, the use of beeswax has become widespread and varied. Purified and bleached beeswax is used in the production of food, cosmetics, and pharmaceuticals. The three main types of beeswax products are yellow, white, and beeswax absolute. Yellow beeswax is the crude product obtained from the honeycomb, white beeswax is bleached yellow beeswax, and beeswax absolute is yellow beeswax treated with alcohol.[8] In food preparation, it is used as a coating for cheese; by sealing out the air, protection is given against spoilage (mold growth). Beeswax may also be used as a food additive E901, in small quantities acting as a (glazing agent), which serves to prevent water loss, or used to provide surface protection for some fruits. Soft gelatin capsules and tablet coatings may also use E901. Beeswax is also a common ingredient of natural chewing gum.

Use of beeswax in skin care and cosmetics has been increasing. A German study found beeswax to be superior to similar barrier creams (usually mineral oil-based creams such as petroleum jelly), when used according to its protocol.[9] Beeswax is used in lip balm, lip gloss, hand creams, and moisturizers; and in cosmetics such as eye shadow, blush, and eye liner. Beeswax is an important ingredient in moustache wax and hair pomades, which make hair look sleek and shiny.

Candle-making has long involved the use of beeswax, which is highly flammable, and this material traditionally was prescribed (in large part), for the making of the Paschal candle or "Easter candle". It is further recommended for the making of other candles used in the liturgy of the Roman Catholic Church.[10] Beeswax is also the candle constituent of choice in the Orthodox Church.[11]

Source:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beeswax